The Creative Destruction of Medicine: How the Digital Revolution Will Create Better Health Care

The Creative Destruction of Medicine: How the Digital Revolution Will Create Better Health Care

What if your cell phone could detect cancer cells circulating in your blood or warn you of an imminent heart attack? Mobile wireless digital devices, including smartphones and tablets with seemingly limitless functionality, have brought about radical changes in our lives, providing hyper-connectivity to social networks and cloud computing. But the digital world has hardly pierced the medical cocoon.

 Until now. Beyond reading email and surfing the Web, we will soon be checking our vital signs on our phone. We can already continuously monitor our heart rhythm, blood glucose levels, and brain waves while we sleep. Miniature ultrasound imaging devices are replacing the icon of medicine—the stethoscope. DNA sequencing, Facebook, and the Watson supercomputer have already saved lives. For the first time we can capture all the relevant data from each individual to enable precision therapy, prevent major side effects of medications, and ultimately to prevent many diseases from ever occurring. And yet many of these digital medical innovations lie unused because of the medical community’s profound resistance to change. In The Creative Destruction of Medicine, Eric Topol—one of the nation’s top physicians and a leading voice on the digital revolution in medicine—argues that radical innovation and a true democratization of medical care are within reach, but only if we consumers demand it. We can force medicine to undergo its biggest shakeup in history. This book shows us the stakes—and how to win them.

Title:The Creative Destruction of Medicine: How the Digital Revolution Will Create Better Health Care
Edition Language:English
ISBN:9780465025503
Format Type:

    The Creative Destruction of Medicine: How the Digital Revolution Will Create Better Health Care Reviews

  • E-patient Dave

    I come from high tech, where there are zillions of innovations, few get any traction, and a small number change the world. This book is by far the best marriage I've seen of potent innovator thinking ...

  • Alistair

    An MD discovers the iPhone, gets completely carried away and declares it will disrupt most of the field of medicine (and gives a well-received TED talk along the way). Maybe I exaggerate slightly, but...

  • loafingcactus

    The book gives you all the pieces that will lead to a medical revolution. The revolution won't occur in hospitals or in legacy research tracks. You don't reposition yourself into a revolution. It also...

  • Ben Z.

    This book was though-provoking. The author believes that healthcare is reaching a critical convergence with technology that will revolutionize how patients are treated, how doctors provide care, how d...

  • James

    Current, predictive and a great business opportunity. Idiopathic therapies based on gnomic results. 4 years ago at the company I work for I was show how cancer is detected in cells. At that time you w...

  • Chris

    This book has a lot of promise but I found myself getting bogged down and skipping around after 80 pages or so. The chapters on biology and anatomy felt like I was reading a textbook. At times this bo...

  • Karel Baloun

    Outstanding objective book predicting key aspects of a medical revolution this decade -- individualized, proactive wellness, led by people and distributed sensors and data rather than professional med...

  • Scott

    Eric Topol has created a compelling vision of technology enabled individualized medicine. I had the opportunity to talk with the president of the Massachusetts Medical Society, an oncologist, a few ye...

  • Christopher Benassi

    Interesting overview on the convergence of wireless sensors, genomics, imaging, and medical records. Understanding how the fields of biology, physiology, and anatomy will technologically overlap prese...

  • Tiago

    Here is an interesting book by Eric Topol, a renowned cardiologist with a social network presence (I discovered him on Twitter). He starts with a critique of the population-based medicine paradigm and...